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Mt Brown Hawk Watch 2020

Species Composition

Species composition changes over time depending on weather, seasons, and many other factors. This chart displays the composition over a time period you select.

Click on pie pieces to see more detail. If there are more than seven species, click on "Other" to see a breakdown of the rest.

Display

Many sites have a protocol that is designed to maximize finding particular species. If you select "Focus Species," only these species will be shown.

Date Selector

The control box below the pie chart lets you select a date period for the chart.

You can push the buttons "1d," "1w," or "1m" to zoom the graph to 1 day, 1 week, or 1 month.

The graph shows the overall volume seen on each day. You can drag the sliders on each side of this graph to adjust the start and end dates.

Species Composition
September 10th to October 31st

Drag the Sliders Below to Change the Dates Shown

Hourly Data

The time shown in the top row is the start of the one hour period.

Select Day

Choose a date to load the hourly table for that day. Only days that have data are shown.

Daily Counts

These charts show which species are most numerous at different parts of the season. Hover your mouse over a chart to see the number for a given day. The right column shows season totals and the left side shows the maximum for a single day. Each graph is scaled so that the single-day maximum is the highest point on the chart.

Sort By
  • Focus Species: Show the highest priority species at the top of the list.
  • Taxonomic Order: Sort the species by their scientific classification.
  • Alphabetic Order: Sort the species by their common name.
  • Abundance: Sort the species with the largest number counted at the top.

Daily Counts

Turkey Vulture
1
Osprey
1
Golden Eagle
1531
Northern Harrier
8
Sharp-shinned Hawk
185
Cooper's Hawk
85
Northern Goshawk
26
Accipiter sp.
44
Show More Species

Site Weather

Mt Brown Hawk Watch 2020

In celebration of the Year of the Bird (2018), Glacier National Park launched a new Hawk Watch Program where park biologists teach volunteers how to count migrating raptors. Each year, Golden Eagles migrate from northern breeding grounds to warmer climates. One of the most important North American Golden Eagle migration routes passes directly through Glacier National Park along the Continental Divide. Large numbers of other raptors also use this migration corridor during the fall and spring months.

Directions

Hike approximately 4.5 miles up the Mount Brown Trail (roughly 4,000 feet in elevation gain). The count will be held on specific days in September and October from 10 am to 4 pm. If fire conditions do not allow access, an alternate site may be identified.

Glacier National Park

The Glacier National Park Citizen Science Program engages park visitors, students, and staff in collection of scientific information that would otherwise be unavailable to resource managers and researchers. Since 2005, the Citizen Science Program has invited members of the public to assist in biological research while recreating in the park.

About the Data

All data displayed on this site are preliminary and have not yet undergone quality control. Written permission is required to use the data.

The program is made possible by the generous support of the Glacier National Park Volunteer Associates and the Glacier National Park Conservancy.